Kocher , Emil Theodor
(1841–1917) Swiss surgeon
Kocher, an engineer's son from Bern in Switzerland, graduated in medicine from the university there in 1865. He later studied surgery in Berlin, Paris, and in London under Joseph Lister, and in Vienna under Theodor Billroth. Kocher served as professor of clinical surgery at the University of Bern from 1872 until his retirement in 1911 although he continued as head of the University surgical clinic until his death.
Using the antiseptic techniques developed by Lister, Kocher, following the initiative of Billroth, played an important role in developing the operation of thyroidectomy for the treatment of goiter, a not uncommon complaint in Switzerland. By 1914 Kocher was able to report a mortality of only 4.5% from over 2000 operations.
Earlier however, Kocher discovered that while technically successful the operation was responsible for the unnecessary ruin of many lives. In 1883, he found to his horror that something like a third of his patients who had undergone thyroidectomy were suffering from what was politely termed operative myxedema; they had in fact been turned into cretins once the source of the thyroid hormone (thyroxine) had been removed. Kocher showed that such tragedies could be prevented by not removing the whole of the thyroid, for even a small portion possesses sufficient physiological activity to prevent such appalling consequences.
For this work Kocher was awarded the 1909 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

Scientists. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Kocher, Emil Theodor — Cirujano suizo nacido en 1841. Recibió el premio Nobel de Medicina y Fisiología por sus estudios sobre el tiroides. También investigó sobre las glándulas linfáticas, el tiroides y el bocio. Falleció en 1917. Medical Dictionary. 2011 …   Diccionario médico

  • KOCHER Emil Theodor — (1841 1917) (retrato) [véase http://www.iqb.es/diccio/k/k.htm#kocher]: cirujano suizo, premio Nobel de 1909 por sus trabajos sobre la fisiología del tiroides Diccionario ilustrado de Términos Médicos.. Alvaro Galiano. 2010 …   Diccionario médico

  • Kocher, Emil Theodor — Kocher, Emil Theodor, Chirurg, geb. 25. Aug. 1841 in Bern, studierte daselbst, in Berlin, London, Paris, habilitierte sich 1866 als Privatdozent in Bern und wurde 1872 ordentlicher Professor und Direktor der chirurgischen Klinik daselbst. K.… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Kocher, Emil Theodor — born Aug. 25, 1841, Bern, Switz. died July 27, 1917, Bern Swiss surgeon. He was the first surgeon to remove the thyroid gland to treat goitre (1876). He later found that total removal could cause a state resembling cretinism, but that leaving… …   Universalium

  • Kocher, Emil Theodor — ► (1841 1917) Fisiólogo y cirujano suizo. Fue premio Nobel de Medicina y Fisiología en 1909, por su contribución a la fisiopatología y terapéutica quirúrgica de los procesos tiroideos. * * * (25 ago. 1841, Berna, Suiza–27 jul. 1917, Berna).… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Emil Theodor Kocher — Nombre Emil Theod …   Wikipedia Español

  • Emil Theodor Kocher — Kocher, Emil Theodor Cirujano suizo nacido en 1841. Recibió el premio Nobel de Medicina y Fisiología por sus estudios sobre el tiroides. También investigó sobre las glándulas linfáticas, el tiroides y el bocio. Falleció en 1917. Medical… …   Diccionario médico

  • Emil Theodor Kocher — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Kocher. Emil Theodor Kocher Emil Theodor Kocher Naissance 25 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Emil Theodor Kocher — (* 25. August 1841 in Bern; † 27. Juli 1917 ebenda) war ein Schweizer Chirurg. Er erhielt als erster Chirurg den Nobelpreis für Medizin 1909. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Leben 2 Werk 3 Weblinks …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Emil Theodor Kocher — Infobox Medical Person name = Emil Theodor Kocher imagesize = 180px caption = Emil Theodor Kocher birth date = August 25, 1841 birth place = Berne, Switzerland death date = death date and age|1917|7|27|1841|8|25 death place = profession = Surgeon …   Wikipedia

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