Robertson , John Monteath
(1900–1989) British x-ray crystallographer
Robertson was born in Auchterarder, Scotland, and educated at Glasgow University where he obtained his PhD in 1926. From 1928 until 1930 he studied at the University of Michigan and then worked at the Royal Institution throughout the 1930s. After brief periods at the University of Sheffield and with Bomber Command of the Royal Air Force, he returned to Glasgow in 1942 and served as professor of chemistry until his retirement in 1970.
Robertson was one of the key figures who, centered on the Braggs and the Royal Institution, developed x-ray crystallography in the interwar period into one of the basic tools of both the physical and life sciences. He established structures for a large number of molecules, including accurate measurements of bond length in naphthalene, anthracene, and similar hydrocarbons. He also worked on the structure of the important pigment phthalocyanine (1935), durene (1933), pyrene (1941), and copper salts (1951). A notable contribution to the technique was his development of the heavy-atom substitution method, which he used in his investigation of phthalocyanine. This involves substituting a heavy atom into the molecule investigated. The change in intensity of diffracted radiation gives essential information on the phases of scattered waves.
In 1953 Robertson published a full account of his work in hisOrganic Crystals and Molecules in which he demonstrated the growing success in applying the new techniques of x-ray crystallography to complex organic molecules.

Scientists. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • John Robertson — may refer to:Politicians:* John Robertson (Canadian politician) (1799 1876), Scottish born member of the Canadian Senate from 1867. * John Robertson (United States congressman) (1787 ndash;1873), member of the United States Congress in the 19th… …   Wikipedia

  • Monkredding House, North Ayrshire — Monkredding Kilwinning, North Ayrshire, Scotland UK grid reference NS4084831699 …   Wikipedia

  • Davy Medal — Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff, the first recipients of the award. They were awarded the medal for their researches discoveries in spectrum analysis . The Davy Medal is awarded by the Royal Society of London for an out …   Wikipedia

  • Davy Medal — Die Davy Medaille ist die höchste britische Auszeichnung für Wissenschaftler auf dem Gebiet der Chemie. Sie besteht aus Bronze und wird seit 1877 jährlich von der Royal Society vergeben. Benannt ist sie nach dem britischen Chemiker und Physiker… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Davy Medal — Médaille Davy Depuis 1877, la Médaille Davy est une distinction scientifique décernée annuellement par la Royal Society (académie des sciences britannique). Cette médaille de bronze frappée à l effigie de Sir Humphry Davy vise à récompenser des… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Medaille Davy — Médaille Davy Depuis 1877, la Médaille Davy est une distinction scientifique décernée annuellement par la Royal Society (académie des sciences britannique). Cette médaille de bronze frappée à l effigie de Sir Humphry Davy vise à récompenser des… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Médaille Davy — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Davy (homonymie). Depuis 1877, la Médaille Davy est une distinction scientifique décernée annuellement par la Royal Society. Cette médaille de bronze frappée à l effigie de Humphry Davy vise à récompenser des… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Medalla Davy — Davy Medal Premio a Descubrimientos en el campo de la química. Otorgados por Royal Society País …   Wikipedia Español

  • Davy-Medaille — Die Davy Medaille ist die höchste britische Auszeichnung für Wissenschaftler auf dem Gebiet der Chemie. Sie besteht aus Bronze und wird seit 1877 jährlich von der Royal Society vergeben. Benannt ist sie nach dem britischen Chemiker und Physiker… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 1960 en science — Années : 1957 1958 1959  1960  1961 1962 1963 Décennies : 1930 1940 1950  1960  1970 1980 1990 Siècles : XIXe siècle  XXe siècl …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”