Mitchell , Peter Dennis
(1920–1992) British biochemist
Born at Mitcham in Surrey, Mitchell was educated at Cambridge University, where he obtained his PhD in 1950. He remained at Cambridge, teaching in the department of biochemistry until 1955, when he moved to Edinburgh University as director of the Chemical Biology Unit. In 1964 Mitchell made the unusual decision to set up his own private research institution, the Glynn Research Laboratory, in Bodmin, Cornwall.
It was well known that the cell obtains its energy from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule; it was also clear that ATP was made by coupling adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to an inorganic phosphate group by the process known to biochemists as oxidative phosphorylation. What was less clear was just how this happened and it was widely assumed that it was controlled by a number of enzymes. Despite considerable effort the proposed enzymes remained surprisingly elusive.
Beginning in 1961 Mitchell proposed a completely different and totally original model, without any obvious precursors and judged to be unorthodox to the point of eccentricity. He suggested a physical mechanism by which an electrochemical gradient is created across the cellular membrane; this, in turn, creates a proton current capable of controlling the phosphorylation.
For his account of such processes Mitchell was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize for chemistry.

Scientists. . 2011.

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  • Mitchell, Peter Dennis — born , Sept. 29, 1920, Mitcham, Surrey, Eng. died April 10, 1992, Bodmin, Cornwall British chemist. He discovered how the distribution of enzymes in mitochondrial membranes helps them use energy from hydrogen ions to convert ADP to ATP. He… …   Universalium

  • Mitchell, Peter Dennis — (29 sep. 1920, Mitcham, Surrey, Inglaterra–10 abr. 1992, Bodmin, Cornwall). Químico británico. Descubrió cómo la distribución de las enzimas en las membranas mitocondriales les ayuda a usar energía proveniente de los ioneshidrógeno para convertir …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Peter Dennis Mitchell — (* 29. September 1920 in Mitcham (Surrey, England); † 10. April 1992 in Bodmin (Cornwall, England)) war ein britischer Chemiker, der 1978 den Nobelpreis für Chemie für seine Forschungen zur Energieumwandlung in Zellen erhielt. Er studierte an der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Peter Dennis Mitchell — Peter Mitchell Pour les articles homonymes, voir Mitchell. Peter Dennis Mitchell est un chimiste anglais né en 1920 et décédé en 1992. Il a reçu le prix Nobel de chimie pour sa Théorie chimiosmotique en 1978. Liens externes (en) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Peter Dennis Mitchell — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Peter Dennis Mitchell (* Mitcham, Inglaterra, 29 de septiembre de 1920 Bodmin, 10 de abril de 1992) fue un bioquímico inglés galardonado con el Premio Nobel de Química del año 1978. Biografía Sus padres fueron… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Chemienobelpreis 1978: Peter Dennis Mitchell —   Der britische Biochemiker wurde für seinen »durch die Aufstellung der chemiosmotischen Theorie begründeten Beitrag zum Verständnis der biologischen Energieübertragung« ausgezeichnet.    Biografie   Peter Dennis Mitchell, * Mitcham (England) 29 …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Mitchell — Peter Dennis …   Scientists

  • Peter D. Mitchell — Peter Mitchell Pour les articles homonymes, voir Mitchell. Peter Dennis Mitchell est un chimiste anglais né en 1920 et décédé en 1992. Il a reçu le prix Nobel de chimie pour sa Théorie chimiosmotique en 1978. Liens externes (en) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Mitchell — Mitchell, Margaret Mitchell, Peter ► Río de Australia, en el N de Queensland. Nace cerca de Rumula y desemboca en el golfo de Carpentaria; 475 km. * * * (as used in expressions) Helen Porter Mitchell Mitchell, Arthur Mitchell, Billy William… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Dennis — Dennis, Nigel * * * (as used in expressions) Mitchell, Peter Dennis Potter, Dennis (Christopher George) Ruth Dennis …   Enciclopedia Universal

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