Adhemar , Alphonse Joseph
(1797–1862) French mathematician
Adhemar, who was born and died in Paris, France, was a private mathematics tutor who also produced a number of popular mathematical textbooks.
His most important scientific work was his Les Revolutions de la mer (1842) in which he was the first to propose a plausible mechanism by which astronomical events could produce ice ages on Earth. It had been known for some time that while the Earth moved in an elliptical orbit around the Sun it also rotated about an axis that was tilted to its orbital plane. Because the orbit is elliptical and the Sun is at one focus, the Earth is closer to the Sun at certain times of year. As a result, the southern hemisphere has a slightly longer winter than its northern counterpart. Adhemar saw this as a possible cause of the great Antarctic icesheet for, as this received about 170 hours less solar radiation per year than the Arctic, this could just be sufficient to keep temperatures cold enough to permit the ice to build up.
Adhemar was also aware that the Earth's axis does not always point in the same direction but itself moves around a small circular orbit every 26,000 years. Thus he postulated a 26,000-year cycle developing in the occurrence of glacial periods, but his views received little support.

Scientists. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Adhemar — Alphonse Joseph …   Scientists

  • Adhémar — Adhémar, Alphonse Joseph, Mathematiker, geboren im Februar 1797 in Paris, gest. daselbst 1862 als Privatlehrer der Mathematik, schrieb mehrere Elementarbücher sowie unter dem Titel »Cours de mathématiques à l usage de l ingénieur civil« (Par.… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Joseph Adhemar — Infobox Scientist name = Joseph Adhemar caption = Joseph Adhemar (1797 1862) birth date = February 1797 birth place = Paris, France death date = 1862 death place = Paris, France residence = nationality = field = Mathematics work institution =… …   Wikipedia

  • Joseph-Alphonse Adhemar — Joseph Alphonse Adhémar Joseph Alphonse Adhémar (1797 1862) était un mathématicien français. Il a été le premier à suggérer que les ères glaciaires étaient contrôlées par des forces astrophysiques dans son livre « Révolutions de la… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Joseph-alphonse adhémar — (1797 1862) était un mathématicien français. Il a été le premier à suggérer que les ères glaciaires étaient contrôlées par des forces astrophysiques dans son livre « Révolutions de la mer » (1842). Il est un des scientifiques à l… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Joseph-Alphonse Adhemar — Joseph Alphonse Adhémar (* 1797; † 1862) war ein französischer Mathematiker. Adhémar schlug als erster astronomische Ursachen, nämlich die Exzentrizität der Erdbahn um die Sonne für die Entstehung der Eiszeiten vor ( Révolutions de la mer.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Joseph Alphonse Adhemar — Joseph Alphonse Adhémar (* 1797; † 1862) war ein französischer Mathematiker. Adhémar schlug als erster astronomische Ursachen, nämlich die Exzentrizität der Erdbahn um die Sonne für die Entstehung der Eiszeiten vor ( Révolutions de la mer.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Joseph Alphonse Adhémar — (* 1797; † 1862) war ein französischer Mathematiker. Adhémar schlug als erster astronomische Ursachen, nämlich die Exzentrizität der Erdbahn um die Sonne für die Entstehung der Eiszeiten vor ( Révolutions de la mer. Déluges périodiques ). Unter… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Joseph Adhemar — Joseph Alphonse Adhémar (* 1797; † 1862) war ein französischer Mathematiker. Adhémar schlug als erster astronomische Ursachen, nämlich die Exzentrizität der Erdbahn um die Sonne für die Entstehung der Eiszeiten vor ( Révolutions de la mer.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Joseph Adhémar — Joseph Alphonse Adhémar (* 1797; † 1862) war ein französischer Mathematiker. Adhémar schlug als erster astronomische Ursachen, nämlich die Exzentrizität der Erdbahn um die Sonne für die Entstehung der Eiszeiten vor ( Révolutions de la mer.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”